BHRS Council Elections 2022

Many thanks to everyone for their interest in joining the BHRS Council.  Voting is now open in all categories (except the Nurse category which did not need to go to vote).  Please complete the form (found below the candidate information on this page) and choose your preferred candidate (s) for each discipline on BHRS Council.  You can vote in as little, or as many, of the categories as you wish.  The candidate with the most votes in each area will be formally elected and be welcomed at the BHRS AGM later this year.  Deadline for votes is 31st August 2022.

President Elect Candidates

Eleri Gregory

I have been fortunate to have chaired and presented at a wide range of meetings and educational events, allowing me to share my passion for rhythm management with peers, colleagues, and trainees. I’m involved with the delivery of undergraduate and postgraduate arrhythmia teaching.

I have been a physiologist representative for the BHRS for 4 years and honorary secretary for 3 years. By working closely with colleagues across all disciplines I have a good understanding of the different groups represented by the society. The BHRS considers the needs of all associated disciplines, and I would develop this further by engaging with all professionals involved with arrhythmia management.

If elected, I would ensure the BHRS represents the interests of its members and encourages professionals to be a part of promoting diversity and improving arrhythmia care for all. With a newly formed education committee alongside the accreditation committee, the BHRS is diversifying, providing a platform of education for the rhythm management community. There are an increasing number of opportunities for all members to engage with the BHRS and as President, I would hope to further encourage the inclusivity of all members.

Ross Hunter

I count many physiologists, nurses and other staff groups amongst my friends. A key part of my role would be to continue to expand career opportunities and break current career “glass ceilings” for these groups by promoting:
• Independent/leading research roles, including creation of a customised doctoral degree at QMUL intended primarily (but not only) for physiologists
• Consultant posts particularly for physiologists and arrhythmia nurses
• Sabbaticals or exchanges with industry and centres abroad.

During my last term I was BHRS deputy research lead and also a board member of the BHRS Multi-Centre Trials Group. I will continue promoting multicentre research, trials, and movement of fellows, physiologists and nurses for research fellowships. As BHRS representative to NICOR I contributed to their last reports. I gained valuable experience and hope to do more in this role.

I remain passionate about both EP and devices. I will promote standardisation of practice across the UK and subspecialisation to ensure best outcomes for patients. With enormous waiting lists in some areas post Covid I will help centres share waiting lists and resources where possible to help reduce this burden and the impact on patients.

Doctor Candidates

Ashley Nisbet

In this role I have been involved in developing the new curriculum for cardiology and EP training as well as navigating our trainees and future colleagues through the challenges that the covid pandemic has put in the way of their training and would like to continue to advocate for trainees as a member of BHRS council. I have close links with the BJCA and continue to contribute to training and development through this role, with a focus on effective skills development in challenging times, combined with fair assessment of trainees.

I have contributed to the excellent piece of work created by BCS Women In Cardiology Council to improve support for cardiologists and trainees during pregnancy, fertility treatment and parental leave with the aim of encouraging more female trainees to consider EP as a career, by dispelling the myths perceived as a barrier to EP as a career choice for female trainees.  My continued position on council would allow me to represent Women in EP particularly, as I feel it is crucial that we display diversity and equality within the society, particularly visibility of role models to encourage high quality trainees into the specialty, regardless of gender.

Claire Martin

Randomized control trials in particular need collaboration across multiple sites to recruit adequate numbers, and I have a track record in coordinating and organising this.

As a regular contributor to the Heart Rhythm Congress, I would continue to strongly promote education among fellows and AHPs. I would also strive to increase diversity across the BHRS membership, and particularly in trying to increase the number of female Electrophysiologists in the UK.

I am keen to participate in the shaping of arrhythmia management in the years to come. Particularly areas such as persistent AF ablation require a unified approach to patient selection to ensure that patients have access to procedures that can provide benefit in a cost effective manner, and I would work with other members of the BHRS Council to form guidelines for this.

Nicholas Child

…and streamlined our service which I probably wouldn’t have been as successful with so quickly within a bigger established tertiary centre. It would be a fantastic opportunity to work with the BHRS and represent a growing number of electrophysiologists working between tertiary and secondary care and focus on the many benefits this brings to both centres and to patients as a whole.

Ross Hunter

I count many physiologists, nurses and other staff groups amongst my friends. A key part of my role would be to continue to expand career opportunities and break current career “glass ceilings” for these groups by promoting:
• Independent/leading research roles, including creation of a customised doctoral degree at QMUL intended primarily (but not only) for physiologists
• Consultant posts particularly for physiologists and arrhythmia nurses
• Sabbaticals or exchanges with industry and centres abroad.

During my last term I was BHRS deputy research lead and also a board member of the BHRS Multi-Centre Trials Group. I will continue promoting multicentre research, trials, and movement of fellows, physiologists and nurses for research fellowships. As BHRS representative to NICOR I contributed to their last reports. I gained valuable experience and hope to do more in this role.

I remain passionate about both EP and devices. I will promote standardisation of practice across the UK and subspecialisation to ensure best outcomes for patients. With enormous waiting lists in some areas post Covid I will help centres share waiting lists and resources where possible to help reduce this burden and the impact on patients.

Vinit Sawhney

My cardiology and academic career has been on the NE Thames training scheme.  My active publication record, passion for education (MA in medical education and developing EP simulation program) and experience of working with a diverse group of staff and patients is relevant to this role. The breadth of my geographical, institutional and personal experience is unique and central to bringing about change where necessary.

My BHRS aspirations: 1. Provide leadership and mentorship to promote diversity in professionals and bridge the existing gender gap within electrophysiology. This can be achieved by attracting and retaining trainees at early stages to achieve a critical mass that will potentiate itself over time. 2. My aim is to enable our society to design and deliver pre-eminent guideline changing trials in congenital electrophysiology. This can be facilitated via the already established BHRS Multicentre trials group with further extension to our European colleagues. To this effect, I am currently leading on the EMEA GUCH working group for the Mustard/Senning registry. 3. Improve opportunities for research funding for AHPs 4. Increase the involvement of patient organisations with UK arrhythmia research.

Doctor (who does not perform ablation & works in a non – tertiary center) Candidates

Brian Gordon

I am therefore seeking election to council to be a voice for secondary care but also to advocate for better collaboration between centres who ablate and those who do not.

The NHS is going through a period of intense difficulty and cardiac services are not immune to the stretched resource, staffing crisis and slowly decaying morale. I am therefore seeking election to council to be a positive influence in a time of sustained pressure and to promote networking and shared experience between colleagues.

The BHRS is in a unique position to ensure clinical excellence from all centres and individuals who are involved in providing cardiac rhythm services. I am therefore seeking election to council to participate in the development of improved educational resources and guideline development that will aid not only the rhythm specialist but other clinical teams across the medical specialities who acutely care for patients who present with arrhythmias. Thank you for considering me for this important role.

Ian Williams

I have presided over an evolution to deliver all aspects of bradycardia and complex pacing. I have fought against under-resourcing and restrictions on service development. I continue to face the consequences of inadequate capacity, growing demand and spiralling waiting times. We are amongst the largest pacing centres in the country, with amongst the lowest per capita staffing levels. The 2020/21 NICOR data shows we countered the national trend during COVID and increased our implantation rates. The department is supported by some of the numerically busiest implanters in the country. I have nurtured that growth and we have maintained a comprehensive contribution to the NICOR data set.

I can bring clinical experience, a track record of departmental, service and skills development and expansion, and a knowledge derived from collaborative clinical and research work with other centres, whilst still facing the daily realities of financial and managerial restrictions. I want to understand experience nationally in order to empower other centres to challenge their Trust risk structures and to ensure we deliver timely, safe and effective services.

Mark Tanner

Today’s NHS faces unprecedented challenges and we will have to think imaginatively to deliver effective, efficient care. The BHRS plays a critical role in tackling these challenges through supporting and leading the UK’s arrhythmia community.

I have experience in the use of digital technology to streamline arrhythmia pathways and have served as a regular NICE expert advisor for these technologies. Through working with tertiary centre colleagues I have developed skills in conduction system pacing, and worked with physiologists to deploy a local CSP service. I was the professional expert for NICE guidance on His-Bundle pacing (2021).

I have set up an innovation and improvement hub to engage with our specialist nurses and physiologists to aid service development.

If elected I would further develop the BHRS’ support for centres to showcase innovative practice and improve national delivery of high quality care through sharing such practice through the BHRS network. The importance of the UK arrhythmia community to unite, share, support and inspire, has never been greater and I am committed to the BHRS’ vision to achieve this.

Paul Foley

I have represented the Council on NHSI groups on atrial fibrillation (lifestyle modification support requested), sudden cardiac death working group, and worked with the RC of pathologists on post-mortems recommendations. I have helped Health Education England with expansion and training of Cardiac Physiologists. I organised the BHRS Covid webinar at the start of the pandemic.

I am keen to represent grass roots cardiologists, physiologists and nursing staff and help continue the close working with our electrophysiology colleagues. I am keen to expand physiological pacing training, and to help our patients get timely, quality treatment. There are exciting developments planned with a BHRS meeting which I would like to help make a big success. Training of SPRs, nursing staff and physiologists is a priority for me.

Physiologist Candidates

Adam Marzetti

I would like to work with the BHRS to deliver further educational programmes to both medical and non-medical colleagues who wish to develop their knowledge within cardiac devices

Additionally, as there is a shortage of Cardiac Physiologist/scientists, I would aspire to work with appropriate working bodies (E.g. National School of healthcare science) to address shortages of CRM trained staff and to develop solutions in overcoming barriers to development of Cardiac Physiologists/Scientists in this field. I would also work with BHRS to ensure the current guidelines for cardiac devices are current and take on appropriate tasks should any updates be required.

Finally, I would happily work with the BHRS examination team regarding the BHRS Cardiac devices examination and logbook review and accreditation processes to ensure a swift response to participants in the certification process. I believe it is important to ensure there is a standardised level of competency within the field, so it is important to recognise that all entries (STP, PTP/Apprenticeships) to the specialism are able to access the appropriate resources to achieve the recognised certification as a measure of standard and safe practice for our patients.

Amy Dutton

I have 13 years’ experience in tertiary level cardiology at Wythenshawe where I specialise in cardiac rhythm management.  During this time, I have been fortunate to be supported to achieve BHRS, IBHRE and EHRA accreditation in both cardiac devices and electrophysiology. I am heavily involved in the delivery of training to the next generation of Cardiac Scientists both lecturing and facilitating on the Healthcare Science degree programs for Manchester Metropolitan University. I have first-hand experience of The Academy of Healthcare Science Equivalence process having become a registered Clinical Scientist in 2021.

I am passionate about advanced practice for Cardiac Physiologists having implemented the Physiologist Led ILR Service at my centre and I was one of the first physiologists in the UK to go through a 3D mapping system independence sign off. I have a keen interest in clinical leadership education opportunities for Cardiac Physiologists.

As part of BHRS Council I would help drive and amplify its support of Cardiac Physiologists in advanced practice within the CRM workforce at a time of increasing clinical service demand and diminished resources. I want to help share best practice and guide strategy to the direct benefit of arrhythmia patients across the UK.

Anna Mills

I have supported colleagues to achieve CRM accreditation, led the implementation of multiple innovations, set up internal training programmes and strongly encourage CPD amongst my team.

I work with an incredible group of Physiologists/Scientists, Cardiac nurses, and Consultants, providing a high-quality service to patients in our local community.
I am dedicated to developing CRM services locally and further afield. Working on the BHRS council will give me an opportunity to represent CRM services at a DGH level and help to deliver the NHS long term plan. BHRS work hard providing guidance, standards, and education across our profession. I have the experience and breadth of knowledge to help develop these area’s further, sharing the voice of multi-skilled DGH staff.

I would love to help develop departmental BHRS accreditation, supporting Good Scientific Practice. I am keen to help grow a high quality, achievable departmental accreditation process to align the high-quality care we all provide across the UK. Whether receiving care in the north or south, in England, Scotland or Wales, the level of care, knowledge, and treatment available is, and should be first class. Departmental accreditation is one step to ensure this.

Chloe Howard

I take great pleasure in training students in the department and love to share or discuss interesting case studies. I believe I am at a stage in my career where I can provide a high level of knowledge and understanding of the profession.  I also recognise the importance of representation from a non-tertiary centre. I am really keen to gain an insight and experience into the development of national policies and standards published by the BHRS.

My main interest is syncope and I have recently been working to develop a scientist led clinic at York with ED and GP referral pathways. I am a real advocate for progressing the profession and developing more specific scientist lead services like this. I would also like to develop patient decision aids with the BHRS and improve the management of device selection for all patients. I also think it’s important for members to have access to resources which support staff in having difficult conversations regarding device malfunction or ICD deactivation. If elected I would do my best to champion the workforce and improve the service provided by the BHRS.

Jamie Walton

…which I have channelled through the development of our own service; instating paperless records, remote monitoring and IQIPS accreditation. I have thoroughly enjoyed and embraced the challenges of these transformations and would relish the opportunity to have greater involvement nationally, within our professional body.

Nationally, we are facing numerous challenges which have been exacerbated as a result of the pandemic. This is a real opportunity to develop and innovate in ways we previously couldn’t. My ambition would be to make the most of these opportunities, supporting arrhythmia services by engaging society members; to highlight and share best practice and using this to drive standards/policy. Ensuring members have a real voice.

The development of educational programmes is fundamental to the society’s mission. Alongside the established training and certification, I would like to assure that the education programme targets critical areas of need for both individual and service development; areas such as expanded practices, leadership and quality management. I would also like to explore how the BHRS can support centres working towards IQIPS accreditation to improve the quality of care for arrhythmia patients.

Laura McKay

We have successfully implemented remote services (BeConnected/Focus On).

I am involved in a trial using Abbott’s SyncUp service which has helped to improve patient understanding, compliance and connectivity. We converted to an electronic approach 3 years ago by introducing Mediconnect as our device database. Fortunately, our trust soon followed suit with an electronic patient record system – EPIC. My aspiration for the BHRS is to continually evolve as a recognised society representing outstanding professionals providing exceptional patient care and the most optimum device service. I believe I can assist in achieving this by promoting BHRS registration and accreditation as a standard within the department and throughout my region using the Physiologist network.

I will also use this to support and guide BHRS members completing their logbook/exam to a high standard and ultimately expanding my own professional development. I am keen to lead my profession as a council member by collaborating and sharing experiences and innovative ideas with other members, enabling us to continue to develop and refine the Cardiac Device service throughout the UK whilst bettering overall patient care and experience.

Phil Durkin

I am passionate about advancing healthcare scientists and being part of the BHRS council would provide a fantastic platform to develop this. I would be grateful of the opportunity to share my knowledge and experience in device implant and follow-up, service development, education and leadership. I am also currently involved in the West Yorkshire Heart Failure pathway development program and am excited about how we can align potential developments with the BHRS and members to provide integrated and robust complex device referral pathways.

Vanessa Porter

I have a broad knowledge of both non-invasive and invasive procedures having worked in a Tertiary centre for 13 years

My vision for BHRS is for the organisation to support and educate future physiologists and scientists to improve diagnostic and therapeutic treatment in healthcare. Education, training and screening is imperative to ensure physiologists are trained and accredited in their profession to provide optimum care and improve services.

I have always been a firm believer that academics are important, but equally I often find big organisations need people who work in the field to provide input and feedback to shape the future of how we ensure those who are accredited will provide standardised care. Examinations are important to test knowledge, and the questions that are asked within the exams need to be relevant and test true and representative knowledge, an area I personally feels needs some improvement. I would like to provide support where I can in this field.

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